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Fashion Does Not Fit All

Fashion Does Not Fit All

Minh Tran

March 10, 2021, 8:00:00 AM

They have set specific size standards of what is beautiful and "in style." Knowingly that its audiences come in a spectrum of different sizes, young teens that do not fit in those standards will feel rejected by their peers.

The fashion/beauty industry is a multi-billion dollar industry that captivates millions of fashionistas worldwide. The photoshopped images presented in mainstream magazines and media are creating a false representation of true beauty. These glamorous expressions of successful individuals are plastered all over teenager's bedroom walls across the country. This is causing a false narrative in our developing teen's mind.

Hundreds of thousands of young men and women mimic this lifestyle as they read and see it in the media and develop a self-hate cycle and spend their hard-earned income fulfilling their ideal fantasies.

The fashion industry is all about change, and it responds to today's society and pop culture. It is being the leader of inventing new shapes in clothing. They have set specific size standards of what is beautiful and "in style." Knowingly that its audiences come in a spectrum of different sizes, young teens that do not fit in those standards will feel rejected by their peers.

Many published articles about the youth experiencing size inequality, is developing mental illness, such as different forms of eating disorders and self-harm, have surfaced to these fashion companies' bias, designing clothes to fit just a few of their demographics. When you dive deeper into the industry, you'll hear stories about fashion models allegedly eating nothing but cotton balls and orange juice to sustaining their hunger only to be able to fit in a double 00 dress size. These horrific urban stories have been the foundation of the fashion industry's downfall in The 2000s.

Now, in 2021. We have made some changes with size diversity and inclusion of beauty. Companies and brands have shattered the idea that 'bigger sizes do not make money.' At the same time, Sales numbers have shown that there are more overweight Americans today than years passed. People are shopping, despised the global pandemic. Companies are designing new campaigns to reach their new customers.

Will we see a decrease in young minors' mental health now that brands are more accepting of size equality? Only time can tell.